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Awards and prizes

Frances Hardinge has been shortlisted for and won various awards for her writing.

The Lie Tree wins the UKLA Book Awards 12–16 years category!

"The judges said they were impressed by the 'brilliant powerful language of Frances Hardinge's wholly compelling, dark mystery'. 'The perfectly portrayed Victorian period with the themes of science, religion and the role of women stimulated really interesting class discussion. Despite the fantastically weird story of the Lie Tree itself, this is an intensely human novel with young readers able to really relate to Faith and feel her anger and frustration and her growing realization of parental fallibility.'" More here.

The Lie Tree wins the 2016 Boston Globe / Horn Book Fiction Award!

"It’s heady stuff; but Hardinge maintains masterful control of the whole complex construct: everything from the sentence level (“The boat moved with a nauseous, relentless rhythm, like someone chewing on a rotten tooth”) on up to the larger philosophical and political (i.e., feminist – the revelation of the book’s villain is … a revelation) questions. A stunner," said Martha V Parravano, of Horn Book.

The Lie Tree wins the overall Costa Book of the Year award 2015!

Frances's latest novel first pipped fellow shortlistees Sally Nicholls, Hayley Long and Andrew Norriss to the Costa Children's Book prize, and then went forward to be chosen ahead of works by Andrew Michael Hurley, Kate Atkinson, Andrea Wulf and Don Paterson for the overall award. Read about it here, and watch Frances's acceptance speech – in which she talks about the 'beautiful jungle' of YA fiction – here!

The 2015 British Fantasy Award – Cuckoo Song wins!

Frances' sixth novel, Cuckoo Song, won the prestigious Robert Holdstock Award for Best Novel, presented by the British Fantasy Society at FantasyCon 2015. Here's an article in The Guardian about it!

Frances later tweeted: “I am informed that, when my name was read out, my look of shock was highly comic. (I still keep double-checking the name on the award).”

The Branford Boase award 2006

The Branford Boase Award is awarded annually for the most promising first novel to a first-time writer of a book for young people. At the same time, it marks the important contribution of the editor in identifying and nurturing new talent.

Frances won the award in 2006 for Fly By Night and, in her acceptance speech, she noted the contributions of three editors: Rebecca McNally, Marion Lloyd and Ruth Alltimes.

Other awards and listings